Commander in Chief

Commander in Chief

FDR's Battle With Churchill, 1943

eBook - 2016
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"Superb . . . Hamilton brilliantly sets out Roosevelt's foresight, determination and skill in establishing a new world order." --Fareed Zakaria, Washington Post

"Provocative . . . stimulating to follow." --Thomas E. Ricks, New York Times Book Review

1943 was the year of Allied military counteroffensives, beating back the forces of the Axis powers in North Africa and the Pacific--the "Hinge of Fate," as Winston Churchill called it. In Commander in Chief Nigel Hamilton reveals FDR's true role in this saga: overruling his own Joint Chiefs of Staff, ordering American airmen on an ambush of the Japanese navy's Admiral Yamamoto, facing down Churchill when he attempted to abandon Allied D-day strategy (twice). This FDR is profoundly different from the one Churchill later painted. President Roosevelt's patience was tested to the limit quelling the Prime Minister's "revolt," as Churchill pressured Congress and senior American leaders to focus Allied energy on disastrous fighting in Italy and the Aegean instead of landings in Normandy. Finally, in a dramatic showdown at Hyde Park, FDR had to stop Churchill from losing the war by making the ultimate threat, setting the Allies on their course to final victory.

In Commander in Chief, Hamilton masterfully chronicles the clash of nations--and of two titanic personalities--at a crucial moment in modern history.

"The rebuttal to the Churchill multivolume history . . . The war retains its power to shock and surprise." -- Boston Globe
Publisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xv, 464 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates) : illustrations, maps
ISBN: 9780544277441 (electronic bk.)
0544277449 (electronic bk.)
Call Number: AXIS360 EBOOK 940.532273 HAMILTON

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C0wb0y
Jul 17, 2018

As Churchill said, “History is written by the victors.” The value of this book is in the recounting of facts such as journal entries, not in Hamilton’s interpretation of these facts. Unfortunately there is too strong of a bias that renders his accounting incomplete or inaccurate. Although Hamilton’s writing style is clunky, his book is interesting and disconcerting. It is amazing to see how close the allies were to losing the war. Also disconcerting to realize how incompetent allied political and military leaders were at the time and wonder if things have changed in our current day.

m
mammothhawk229e
Jul 04, 2018

FDR's tact, patience, thinking ahead (Green US army not ready for cross Channel invasion, United Nations postwar, what about Stalin) & visiting the troops at home or near the front just as effective weapons on his blinkered subordinates, Victorian to paranoid allies as to the battle hardened enemies.
What was Hitler's intelligence thinking on Casablanca as "Casa Blanca" as codeword for White House?
Well! It's a bit weird on unearthed stories more akin to say David Weber's Honor Harrington series. It may be slow & long like DW books ,but the author laid out big picture in crisp easy to understand style.

e
Einar
Jan 06, 2018

Excellent read, by a revisionist historian. Good writer with a transparent style, dealing with a complex topic. Read it in one go.

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