The Clockmaker's Daughter

The Clockmaker's Daughter

A Novel

eBook - 2018
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A love affair and a mysterious murder cast their shadows across generations, set in England from the 1860s until the present day.
Publisher: New York, NY : Atria Books, 2018
Characteristics: 1 online resource
Edition: First Atria books hardcover edition
ISBN: 9781451649437 (electronic bk.)
1451649436 (electronic bk.)
Call Number: AXIS360 EBOOK FICTION MORTON

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c
cknightkc
Oct 01, 2019

I’ve read all author Kate Morton’s previous novels, and her latest, THE CLOCKMAKER’S DAUGHTER, once again proves her to be a master storyteller. Enthralling, mysterious, and bewitching is how I describe this book. The plot is intricate involving multiple characters (I recommend making a list as you read), timelines, and points of view. But don’t let that scare you, this novel’s well worth it. One of the many things I admire about Kate Morton is her lyrical writing and her ability to convey the beauty of the English language. I also appreciate her attention to period detail which must require a vast amount of research. If you're like me, an Anglophile and fan of historical fiction, look no further than Kate Morton.

k
kellydelancy
Sep 14, 2019

Meh

g
gailpruett
Sep 02, 2019

Very  book. In and out time lines, too many people, confusing. I enjoyed the last of the book, but not the first of it.

m
MelyssaLynnKoopman
Aug 19, 2019

*SPOILERS*
After only reading a couple chapters, I found the Clockmaker's Daughter had a very similar vibe to The World Before Us by Aislinn Hunter, which happens to be one of my LEAST favorite books of all time. Too many characters, back and forth timelines, and just barely grasping at a "mystery." Turns out the ghost haunting the house actually died...IN THE HOUSE!?! Shocking.

l
lhuigens
Jul 13, 2019

This is a very complex story and you need to be able to concentrate on it while reading. I wasn't at a point where I could do that very well, so I might read it again at a time when life is more calm. I liked this book very much but found it difficult to keep up with all the different story lines and characters as they intertwined.

c
cpernisie
Jun 12, 2019

I really enjoyed this book. It is complicated as it changes time and point of view multiple times through the story, so you need to be on your toes. Interesting premise.

p
pinky0203
Jun 03, 2019

I got to Chapter 3, at 12:45 am, page 61 and I just couldn’t do it anymore. The jacket made it sound a lot more interesting but frankly, I had a hard time getting into it. I give up. Maybe some time in the distant future.

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Bmonson1951
May 29, 2019

The story wa s way too long and convoluted. The narrative became tedious with an unsatisfactory ending. Th e author is as good writer, this was too dense a book.

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matcat44
May 24, 2019

Strange writing, couldn’t get me interested.

d
Dearone011970
Apr 18, 2019

Very disappointed in this book.
First book ever that I couldn't wait to get over with it.

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Quotes

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c
cknightkc
Oct 01, 2019

“Human beings are curators. Each polishes his or her own favored memories, arranging them in order to create a narrative that pleases. Some events are repaired and polished for display; others are deemed unworthy and cast aside, shelved below ground in the overflowing storeroom of the mind. There, with any luck, they are promptly forgotten. The process is not dishonest: it is the only way that people can live with themselves and the weight of their experiences.” - p.60

c
cknightkc
Oct 01, 2019

“Because before Mrs. Mack and the Captain there was my father, always looking for his second chance He was a clockmaker by trade, a master craftsman… ‘Each clock is unique,’ he used to tell me. ‘And just like a person, its face, whether plain or pretty, is but a mask for the intricate mechanism it conceals.” - p.64

c
cknightkc
Oct 01, 2019

‘On Radcliffe’s headstone, in smaller text beneath his name, was written, Here lithe one who sought truth and light and saw beauty in all things, 1842-1882. Leonard found himself staring as he often did at the dash between the dates. Within that lichen-laced mark there lay the entire life of a man: his childhood, his loves, his losses and fears, all reduced to a single chiseled line on a piece of stone in a quiet churchyard at the end of a country lane. “ - p. 230

c
cknightkc
Oct 01, 2019

“If you are to understand my brother…you must stop seeing him as a painter and start seeing him instead as a storyteller. It was his greatest gift. He knew how to communicate, how to make people feel and see and believe. The medium in which he chose to express himself was irrelevant. It is no easy feat to invent a whole world, but Edward could do that. A setting, a narrative, characters who live and breathe—he was able to make the story come to life in someone else’s mind. Have you ever considered the logistics of that…? The transfer of an idea? And, of course, a story is not a single idea; it is thousands of ideas, all working together in concert.”

“What she said was true. As an artist, Edward Radcliffe could transport people, so that they were no longer simply spectators of his work but participants, coconspirators in the realization of the world that he sought to create.” - pp. 239-40

c
cknightkc
Oct 01, 2019

“Time only moved in one direction. And it didn’t stop. It never stopped moving, not even to let a person think. The only way back was in one’s memories.” - p. 315

c
cknightkc
Oct 01, 2019

“Being a parent’s a breeze… No more difficult than flying a plane with a blindfold on and holes in your wings.” - p. 319

c
cknightkc
Oct 01, 2019

“… Juliet wandered the perimeter observing the mottled headstones and contemplating the names and dates, the loving messages of eternity and rest. How remarkable that the human race valued the lives of its individual members sufficiently to commemorate each ones’s brief time on the ancient earth; and yet, at once, could engage in slaughter of the most meaningless and general kind.” - p. 327

c
cknightkc
Oct 01, 2019

“Past, present, future—what did any of it mean, anyway? One could aim to do their best with the circumstances dealt them in the time given. That was all.” - p. 327

c
cknightkc
Oct 01, 2019

“I wonder what Felix, with his lapel button of Abraham Lincoln and his wild predictions for the future, would make of all this. It is just as he said: the camera is ubiquitous. They all carry one now. Even as I watch, they traipse through the rooms of the house, pointing their devices at this chair or those tiles. Experiencing the world at one remove, through the windows of their phones, making images for later so that they do not need to bother seeing or feeling things now.” - p. 338

c
cknightkc
Oct 01, 2019

“People value shiny stones and lucky charms, but they forget that the most powerful talismans of all are the stories that we tell to ourselves and to others.” - p. 481

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